Interviews/Features…

The Cool Thing About Improvisation, All About Jazz Seattle (2005)

Addlimb.org questionnaire (2006)

Blurbs…

" The drums must be the oldest musical instrument of human kind, and no one has ever confronted it with a more unbounded, yet skilled, creativity than has Drury.
David Yearsley, Counterpunch

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…(a) quintessential contemporary creative musician, going off into different directions with different projects. (…) He's done world-class work in whisper precision improv, tricky-heads post-jazz, and other stuff quite different than this go-for-the-jugular mix of old school fireworks improv, new school timbral and textural improv, and power trio joyriding. …It's a fresh, superb thing happening right now, so check it out!
Michael Anton Parker

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…Andrew Drury—together with a fistful of the most adventurous improvisers in the New York scene…—generates a powerful sound consummated through enormous fury.
Luis Daniel Vega, Rolling Stone Edicion Latinoamericano

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…a thoughtfully avant-garde drummer and composer…
Nate Chinen, New York Times

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“(an) outstanding jazz and experimental percussionist…”
Timeout NY

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You may well ask after hearing this excellent CD, who Andrew Drury is and why he isn’t better known. … (H)e’s a sophisticated modern composer… He mixes the sense of rhythm and sensitivity that characterizes drummer-composers like Max Roach and Gerry Hemingway with voicing and arrangements that connect sophisticated EuroImprov sensibility with New World swing. … Evidence here indicates that the playing and writing Drury demonstrates on (A Momentary Lapse) is no momentary lapse.
Ken Waxman, Jazz Word

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…the massively unheralded drummer Andrew Drury continually proves his touch with each stroke.
Jay Collins, Cadence

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…one of downtown’s best percussionists… …another of downtown's under-recognized heroes…
Bruce Gallanter, DMG Newsletter

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… extremely imaginative… …expansive and intimate…something to place alongside … Burkhard Beins, Tatsuya Nakatani, and Le Quan Ninh.
Jason Bivins, Signal to Noise

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Drury’s quest, taking risks like I haven’t seen in a long time, is in service of mystery, of cathartic ambiences, and of an unmistakable intention to produce a disk that is as interesting as it is disconcerting—and more than anything highly recommended. That is, only for ears that are very open.
Yahve M. de la Cavada, Tomajazz

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It is always a thrill when someone comes out of seemingly nowhere to produce something of real thought and originality. Although I am unfamiliar with Andrew Drury, his Polish Theater Posters is an outstanding set of spontaneous and composed music. …A Shoe-in contender for my top ten list, Polish Theater Posters is a strong innovative statement from a young, confident composer and drummer, a recording that is sure to knock the socks off, without self-conscious bombast.
Steven A. Loewy, Cadence

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Andrew Drury is one of those special few who can trailblaze through well-known territory, recombining traditions and familiarities, then transform them into a hotbed of do-it-yourself maximalism. …(T)he tunes definitely become more than the sum of their parts: no frills straight ahead, uninhibited chaos, strict counterpoint exercises, quirky head tunes, off-kilter accompaniments, intense solos, forays into microtonality, extended technique bag o’ tricks on parade, wild chord clusters, introspective unaccompanied episodes, harsh timbres, relentless climaxes, nonsensical repetition, etc. …(T)he music freely evolves wherever the musicians decide to take it…enjoy the ride.
Randy Nordschow, New Music Box

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Drury’s music has a sense of the theater, and though very avant, has a certain accessibility mainly because of the humor, the changes in texture and odd ways of drawing you into the rhythmic landscape. He seems never to be bound by the trappings of musical standards and yet has a solid respect for the bop, post-bop, mainstream jazz idioms, and for a host of other musical styles as well. I’m not sure there is a more interesting and diverse renaissance-styled individual whose sensibility has as much to do with the street as it does the classic confines of jazz. Get his CD, get your kids to his workshops, and keep an eye out for his next appearance… He is a superb drummer and composer, but that is just the beginning.
Chris Lunn, Victory Review

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Splintering rhythmic timbres apart into their simplest, most primeval and discordant pulses… Not for everyone – nor should they be – these CDs demonstrate how the definition of experimental, and creative percussion exists, is expressed and is extended by one talented drummer in the 21st Century.
Ken Waxman, Jazz Word

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As otherworldly as these contributions to the canon sound, they are vital contributions to the jazz spirit of pure innovation.
Mark Miller, All About Jazz NY

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…a receptive, agile percussionist.
Chris Kelsey, Jazz Times

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…wonderful…
Stephen Griffith, Paris Transatlantic

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Indeed his blend of chamber-music rigor, folkish riffs and stop-start pacing is reminiscent for bands that populated the original Knitting Factory in the late 80s …He crafts memorable melodies from his rhythmic figurations..
Steve Smith, Time Out New York

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Drury moves effortlessly from providing percussive color to driving the rhythms. … he sounds like a full Chinese percussion ensemble!
Michael Rosenstein, Signal to Noise

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Drury with his pen and sticks is busy erasing the lines between jazz and contemporary chamber music. …He employs the framework of an improvising jazz ensemble for music informed by classic compositional techniques. Vaxjo Kollektiv…evokes the spirit of Bartok. The very way Drury orchestrates his front line…testifies to his deftness in bringing together disparate elements.
David Dupont, All Music Guide

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Andrew Drury explores his trap set like a primeval nomad. Once responsible for post-modern meltdowns that veered from pulverizing speed metal clichés to blazing post-Bop swagger … on (Reuben Radding’s Fugitive Pieces) Drury leaves that identity behind. Dragging chains over his kit, scraping drum heads, bowing cymbals for harmonics, clattering away on percussive effects of unspecified origin, Drury plays his kit as a kaleidoscopic tower of sound, far removed from its traditional role as time keeper.
Troy Collins, Cadence

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…sparkling ensemble and individual performances. … This is a marvelous record featuring high quality compositions performed by some of the finest forward thinking musicians today.
Jay Collins, All About Jazz

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As a former student of Edward Blackwell you’d expect him to swing hard and fast, and you won’t be disappointed; even more impressive are his composition chops—these nine tracks run the gamut from hard-driving, almost funky, binary, via tight Eastern European-inflected canons and sleek balladry to metrically fiendish unisons, and to play them Drury has assembled one hell of a band… John Zorn must be kicking himself he didn’t snaffle this one up for Tzadik.
Dan Warburton, Paris Transatlantic

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Andrew Drury has put together some very remarkable pieces for his second solo record. (His) composition skills aren’t quite like anything else I have ever heard. I look forward to hearing more…
Kurt Stein, Fever Pitch

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Definitely this is a disk with good and varied compositions, polished arrangements and a collection of musicians as magnificent individually as they are together. For all this I call A Momentary Lapse as a great surprise and a very good disk.
Jose Francisco Tapiz, Tomajazz (Madrid)

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By and large there is something very baroque in his musical concept, as multiple lines run in and out of each other, with sudden changes of tempo and dynamics. …the energy level hits some very stimulating highs, but there are more introspective passages as well, heard to great advantage in the skillfully harmonized voicings… Of its many assets (A Momentary Lapse) shows a real esprit de corps.
Marc Chenard, Squid’s Ear

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Drury’s skill as a solo drummer and group improviser became even more apparent in a trio with Wayne Horvitz and Briggan Krauss. The three improvised long soundscapes, in sync with each other on every modulation. Drury’s experiences playing and studying with Anthony Braxton and Ed Blackwell seem to have developed in him an astonishing clairvoyance.
Mike Marlin, 5/4 Magazine

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Drummer Andrew Drury…is working a nice pathway through the sounds, clattering some, crashing some, and tapping a strange space code that seems to lead ever outward. It’s world-class improvised music, and is getting commensurate critical acclaim.
Andrew Bartlett, The Stranger

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Drury feels at home as much in a swing number like "Salt Water Kandinsky" as in mind-boggling avant rock tornados like the title track and "Football." By the way, don't get fooled by the swing number: It transforms into electric guitar mayhem backed by scorching saxophone à la John Zorn in Pain Killer. The album ends with the pseudo-surf "In the Aftermath (Of Sykes-Picot)," which features demented electric violin playing by Kang. For the first time, an album released in Red Toucan's Exuberance series deserves to be referred to as exuberant.
Francois Couture, All Music Guide

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Drury is constantly evolving, seeking new contexts and voices for his challenging compositions, and continuing to develop his drumming craft. With a deep sense of improvisation, a focused compositional concept, and a keen sense of drama, Drury’s music is both rigorously crafted and liberatingly free.
Michael Allison, Earshot Jazz Magazine

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